minimoli

Collection of minimalistic art and design, for information, educational purpose and sometimes leisure.

julianminima:

Fernanda Gomes

julianminima:

Fernanda Gomes

(Source: emmanuelherve.com, via mini-mal-me)

“Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like.”

—   Will Rogers
\ Another deceptive reproduction of John McLaughlin, #28-1960
\ John Dwyer McLaughlin was born in 1898, in Sharon, Massachusetts. After a brief stint in the Navy during World War I, he went to Boston, and worked in real estate. Through his work he met Florence Emerson—a descendent of Ralph Waldo Emerson—who in 1928 became his wife… continue reading

Another deceptive reproduction of John McLaughlin, #28-1960

John Dwyer McLaughlin was born in 1898, in Sharon, Massachusetts. After a brief stint in the Navy during World War I, he went to Boston, and worked in real estate. Through his work he met Florence Emerson—a descendent of Ralph Waldo Emerson—who in 1928 became his wife… continue reading

sonder

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate…

Jo Baer
\ Graph-Paper Drawings: Triangle (from a set of eight)
\ 1963 - Pencil on Labanotation graph-paper - 15.3 x 15.3 cm

Jo Baer

\ Graph-Paper Drawings: Triangle (from a set of eight)

\ 1963 - Pencil on Labanotation graph-paper - 15.3 x 15.3 cm

Jo Baer
Memorial for an Art World Body (Nevermore)2009 - oil on canvas - 183 cm x 153 cm
Images courtesy of The Artist’s Institute, New York

Jo Baer

Memorial for an Art World Body (Nevermore)
2009 - oil on canvas - 183 cm x 153 cm

Images courtesy of The Artist’s Institute, New York

“We really must understand that the lust for affluence in contemporary society is psychotic. It is psychotic because it has completely lost touch with reality. We crave things we neither need nor enjoy.”

—   1940s. Richard Foster.

\ FRANK STELLA

“Frank Stella, born in 1936 in Malden, Massachusetts, has been considered a major American artist for almost fifty years, becoming, in 1970, the youngest artist ever to have a career retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He is best known for the monochromatic pinstriped paintings that first brought him to prominence, which when seen in person have a very moving, vulnerable quality, and (a few years later) for his color-field paintings on irregularly shaped canvases. He helped legitimize printmaking as an artform in the late 1960s, and his work in the 1980s included paintings in high relief on objects such as freestanding metal pieces that contrasted with his early, minimalist works.”

\

“The systematic quality of Stella’s Black Paintings decisively departed from the ideas of inspired action associated with Abstract Expressionism, the art of the preceding generation, and anticipated the machine-made Minimal art of the 1960s. But many of them… are subtly personal: Stella worked freehand, and irregularities in the lines of the stripes reveal the slight waverings of his brush. His enamel, too, suggests a bow to the Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, who had also used that paint.”

“But I deal with this by meditating and by understanding I’ve been put on the planet to serve humanity. I have to remind myself to live simply and not overindulge, which is a constant battle in a material world.”

—   1954. Sandra Cisneros.
Xerografia originale by Bruno Munari, 1968

Xerografia originale by Bruno Munari, 1968

“Our souls are not hungry for fame, comfort, wealth, or power. Our souls are hungry for meaning, for the sense that we have figured out how to live so that our lives matter.”

—   Harold Kushner. 1935.
Michael Jon
Untitled, 2011Enamel on Canvas, 20” x 17”

Michael Jon

Untitled, 2011
Enamel on Canvas, 20” x 17”

Dan Flavin, some colored options for a Whitney Annual Exhibition, 1970. 
Ballpoint pen, 8-1/2 x 11 inches. 
Collection of Stephen Flavin (c) 2012 Stephen Flavin/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. 
Photo: Graham S. Haber, 2011

Dan Flavin, some colored options for a Whitney Annual Exhibition, 1970.

Ballpoint pen, 8-1/2 x 11 inches.

Collection of Stephen Flavin (c) 2012 Stephen Flavin/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Photo: Graham S. Haber, 2011

“Make things as simple as possible but no simpler.”

—   1879. Albert Einstein.
Sol LeWitt

\ Wall Drawing 138

\ Pencil, Dimensions Variable, 2009

\ Wall Drawing 138 comes from LeWitt’s “Arcs, Circles, and Grids” series. LeWitt’s instructions for Wall Drawing 138 are, “Circles and arcs from the midpoints of four sides.”

Sol LeWitt

\ Wall Drawing 138

\ Pencil, Dimensions Variable, 2009

\ Wall Drawing 138 comes from LeWitt’s “Arcs, Circles, and Grids” series. LeWitt’s instructions for Wall Drawing 138 are, “Circles and arcs from the midpoints of four sides.”